What does Multiple Intelligence mean?

Dr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983.

 

His theory states that we not only have different styles of processing and learning information, but that all of these styles are more or less independent of one another. He challenged the belief that the ‘IQ’ system alone could help gauge the complexities of the human brain and the human potential. Instead he suggested that we factor in "multiple intelligences" to help understand our brain better.

 

According to Gardner, we each have 8 different kinds of intelligences present in are a complex mix to form our individual intelligence. Much like our fingerprints, this combination of the intelligences is unique to every one of us. 

The 8 Multiple Intelligence Areas:
Linguistic Intelligence
 

The capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people’s communications. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.

Logical/Mathematical Intelligence
 

The capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.

Musical Rhythmic Intelligence
 

The capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps even manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, and it is omnipresent.

Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence
 

The capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people’s communications. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.

Spatial Intelligence
 

The capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.

Naturalist Intelligence
 

The ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.

Intrapersonal Intelligence
 

Having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.

Interpersonal Intelligence
 

The ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians - anybody who deals with other people.

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now